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Infusion Therapy: What Is It, What Conditions Does It Treat?

Infusion Therapy: What Is It, What Conditions Does It Treat?

Infusion therapy is used to treat a variety of illnesses, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and some types of cancer. It is used to treat conditions that cannot be treated with oral drugs or that require large dosages of medication. Dr. Nasser Nasseri, MD, and his team at Nasseri Clinic of Arthritic & Rheumatic Diseases provide Infusion Therapy. For more information, contact us or schedule an appointment online. We have convenient locations to serve you in Catonsville, Glen Burnie, Columbia, Baltimore, North Baltimore, Rosedale, and Edgewater, MD.

Infusion Therapy: What Is It, What Conditions Does It Treat? | Nasseri Clinic Near Me in Catonsville, Glen Burnie, Columbia, Baltimore, North Baltimore, Rosedale, and Edgewater, MD
Infusion Therapy: What Is It, What Conditions Does It Treat? | Nasseri Clinic Near Me in Catonsville, Glen Burnie, Columbia, Baltimore, North Baltimore, Rosedale, and Edgewater, MD

Table of Contents:

What illnesses are treated with infusions?
Why would someone need an infusion treatment?
What are the most common infusions?
How long does infusion therapy last?
How do you feel after infusion therapy?

Infusion therapy, a cutting-edge medical treatment offered at Nasseri Clinic of Arthritic and Rheumatologic Diseases, stands as a beacon of hope for patients dealing with severe or chronic conditions that have not responded well to oral medications. This advanced therapy involves administering medication directly into the bloodstream, ensuring faster and more targeted therapeutic effects. At Nasseri Clinic, infusion therapy is utilized to treat a wide range of conditions, especially arthritic and rheumatologic diseases, offering alleviation and improvement in the quality of life for patients navigating these complex health challenges.

What illnesses are treated with infusions?


Infusion therapy serves as a vital treatment option for a variety of illnesses, particularly those that are autoimmune or inflammatory. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis are commonly addressed with this method. Beyond arthritic and rheumatologic diseases, infusion therapy can also be effective in treating gastrointestinal disorders like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, as well as multiple sclerosis and certain types of cancer. This therapeutic approach is often considered when traditional medications fail to provide sufficient relief or when rapid response is crucial for the patient’s health.

Why would someone need an infusion treatment?


Someone might require infusion treatment as a necessary step when their condition does not respond to oral medications, or when a more immediate and direct therapeutic effect is needed. Infusion therapy can offer a quicker and more potent response, especially in severe or chronic cases where time and efficiency are critical. It caters to those seeking relief from persistent symptoms that hinder daily activities, aiming to enhance the quality of life for individuals facing debilitating health challenges. This method, by delivering medication directly into the bloodstream, bypasses the digestive system, ensuring that the full strength of the medication is available to target the illness swiftly and effectively.

What are the most common infusions?


Among the most common infusions, biologic agents stand out due to their targeted approach to treating autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. These include medications such as adalimumab, infliximab, and rituximab, which are specifically designed to modulate the immune system, reducing inflammation and halting disease progression. Another frequently administered infusion is corticosteroids, used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects to quickly address severe flare-ups in conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Iron infusions are also common, offering a crucial solution for individuals suffering from severe iron-deficiency anemia, where oral supplements are ineffective or inadequate. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies, a newer class of drugs, are increasingly used to treat various cancers and diseases like osteoporosis by targeting specific cells or proteins involved in the disease process. These infusions represent a significant advancement in medical treatment, providing patients with options that are both effective and specific to their condition’s needs.

How long does infusion therapy last?


The duration of infusion therapy can vary widely, depending on the specific medication being administered and the condition being treated. Typically, treatment sessions may last anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours, with the frequency of sessions ranging from weekly to every few months. For chronic conditions, patients may need to undergo infusion therapy indefinitely, with sessions spaced out over time as determined by their response to treatment and the guidance of their healthcare provider. The length of each session and the overall treatment plan are carefully tailored to meet the individual needs of the patient, aiming to achieve the best possible outcome while minimizing inconvenience and disruption to the patient’s daily life. The ongoing assessment of the patient’s condition is crucial in determining the duration and frequency of therapy, making adjustments as necessary based on therapeutic response and any changes in the patient’s health status.

How do you feel after infusion therapy?


The immediate aftermath of receiving infusion therapy can vary significantly from patient to patient, depending on their health conditions, the type of medication administered, and their body’s response to the treatment. Commonly, patients report feeling a sense of relief as symptoms, particularly those related to inflammation or autoimmune disorders, begin to subside. Others may experience temporary side effects such as fatigue, slight discomfort at the infusion site, or a feeling of lethargy, which typically diminish within a few days post-treatment. It’s noteworthy that some individuals might also encounter an initial feeling of wellness due to the body’s positive response to the medication, contributing to an improvement in their overall quality of life. Continuous monitoring and feedback to the healthcare team are essential for tailoring future treatments and managing any adverse effects, ensuring that the therapy remains as effective and comfortable as possible.

At Nasseri Clinic, we are committed to providing our patients with cutting-edge, compassionate care that addresses the heart of their health challenges through infusion therapy. Understanding the intricacies of this treatment can be overwhelming, which is why our expert team is here to guide you through every step of your healthcare journey. If you or someone you know is considering infusion therapy, we encourage you to reach out to us. Contact us today or book an appointment online to explore how infusion therapy can offer you relief and improve your quality of life. Together, we can work towards a healthier, more vibrant future for you. We serve patients from Catonsville MD, Glen Burnie MD, Columbia MD, Baltimore MD, North Baltimore MD, Rosedale MD, Edgewater MD, Hebbville MD, Woodlawn MD, Pasadena MD, Jacobsville MD, Ellicott City MD, Laurel MD, Dundalk MD, Halethorpe MD, Overlea MD, Parkville MD, Riva MD, Annapolis MD, Ferndale MD, and surrounding areas.

Locations of Nasseri Clinic of Arthritic and Rheumatic Diseases

Catonsville, MD

  • 700 Geipe Rd, Suite 200B, Catonsville, MD 21228
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Glen Burnie, MD

  • 203 Hospital Dr, Suite 300B, Glen Burnie, MD 21061
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Columbia, MD

  • 5500 Knoll North Dr, Suite 250B, Columbia, MD 21045
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North Baltimore, MD

  • 3333 N. Calvert St, Suite 540B, Baltimore, MD 21218
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Rosedale, MD

  • 9114 Philadelphia Rd., Suite 208B, Rosedale, MD 21237
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Baltimore, MD

  • 724 Maiden Choice Lane, Suite 204B, Baltimore, MD 21228
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Edgewater, MD

  • 3168 Braverton St., Suite 330B, Edgewater, MD 21037
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